Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern FREE

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Falling Spring Crochet Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern Image for Pinterest

A little something before we start…

I am so excited to share my first beanie crochet pattern with you guys! Beanie style hats are one of my absolute favorite projects due to their versatility and usefulness. They work up fairly quickly and make excellent gifts for family and friends of all ages. The warm, cozy texture of the Greenbrier Beanie makes it a perfect winter hat for ladies and takes less than one skein of yarn. Gotta love one skein projects! However, before we start, I want to talk about a few problems I faced when I first started crocheting beanies.

The case of the ever-growing beanie

I have to be honest, guys, my affinity for beanies wasn’t always there. I can still remember the first beanie I ever made. Up until that point in time, I had only worked in rows and I barely knew what the end stitches of my work looked like. Working in the round seemed like a MUCH more confusing task, so I watched multiple video tutorials and read through photo tutorials before tackling my first project. Finally, when I felt like I had a firm understanding of the concept I sat down with a soft acrylic blend yarn, my favorite crochet hook, and hope that I would complete my first beautiful fitted beanie hat.

I followed the pattern, spent hours carefully placing each stitch, and I’m pretty sure that hat would have been too big for an elephant.

So, why did my beanie keep increasing in size?

Later, after doing TONS of research, I learned that I had been adding an extra stitch at the end of each round by placing a stitch into the slip stitch that connected the previous round. This tiny little stitch appears as if it is a normal stitch, but it is simply a connection to the last stitch of the previous row.  For some reason, I accidentally placed an extra stitch in that little slip stitch. I had no idea my stitch count was off either, as I somehow didn’t include the slip stitch -stitch in my count. Confused yet? I was, too.

Since my stitch count appeared to be perfect, I kept pushing through the pattern to see if it all worked out in the end. Everything looked good, there were no gaps or strange places around the seam area and the diameter was increasing as it should. The seam was a little noticeable, but it didn’t necessarily look bad. The problem was that it just wouldn’t stop growing! The sides of the hat refused to go straight down, and my hat was more of a bowl shape than anything. I struggled through quite a few attempts before I found a method that made it all *click*.

If you have ever faced this problem, you are not alone. This is a common mistake made by new crocheters and was one that I made for quite awhile myself.

How do I fix it?

Crocheting in the round can be tricky, but it doesn’t have to be as long as you know what you’re looking for. My trick for keeping the correct count of stitches in each round (especially when working in a continuous spiral) is to use stitch markers at the beginning of a round, at the end of a round, or in both places for good measure. Every time I begin a new round, I place a stitch marker in the first stitch. When I reach the end of the round, I place a stitch marker in the last stitch. Once I started placing stitch markers in the first and last stitches I was able to visibly see where each round ended and the next began. This was an eye-opener for me.

Stitch markers saved the day! Without them, I may have never completed a successful beanie hat.

I went from blindly following pattern instructions, to starting to see how the stitches came together to form a continuous round piece of fabric. Using just one stitch marker proved to not be enough for me in the case of the ever-growing beanie. By using markers at the beginning AND end I was able to see exactly where to put my stitches. (Again, this is most helpful when working in a continuous spiral.)

Another cool trick is to go a step further and place stitch markers at the beginning and end of every single round. When working in a continuous spiral, you will see very quickly how the stitches move the seam over as the hat progresses. When working a straight seam, it can help you see the difference in the last stitch, slip stitch, and first stitch of the round. Crocheting in the round suddenly began to make more sense to me after taking these simple steps.

Try it!

If you’re struggling with super huge beanies that never seem to stop growing, try using stitch markers to see if that helps. You can buy stitch markers in your local craft stores, (such as Michael’s or Jo-Ann’s), or purchase them online for a reasonable price. Amazon has a plethora of stitch markers, which you can see by CLICKING HERE.

Here’s another option: simply use small pieces of yarn to hold your place. This works just as well and is something that you already have on hand. 🙂 I use leftover yarn ends as stitch markers all the time! I do highly recommend investing in some good stitch markers eventually no matter what though. They are extremely handy (and sometimes necessary) when crocheting pieces together (like in amigurumi).

I already use stitch markers, but my beanie is still huge. What gives?

There may be another reason why your beanie might be too big, and it has to do with the number of increases you’ve made for the top of the beanie. When you increase a beanie, you are adding more stitches to each round to expand the fabric outward. The problem lies in the fact that once you are ready to stop increasing, it will actually take another row or two (or three!) before the sides of the beanie start to straighten out.

Typically you are instructed to increase the beanie until it measures the exact diameter or circumference of your head, then begin non-increase rows. Instead, try increasing the top of the beanie until it measures slightly less than the diameter or circumference of your head. This helps account for the next few rounds increasing the beanie ever-so-slightly, and will hopefully give you that fitted look you are going for!

What if I’m making the beanie as a gift, and I have no clue what the recipient’s head size is?

I’m so glad you asked! The amazingly talented Ashlea over at Heart, Hook, Home has an excellent blog post regarding increasing any size crochet beanie. In her post, she explains increases and provides a chart that shows exactly when to stop increasing each round based on average head sizes. How awesome is that?! If you’re struggling with getting the measurements right, I’d highly recommend hopping over to Heart, Hook, Home before jumping into the pattern below.

Here is an overview of some of the most common culprits to blame for super gigantic hats:
  • Increased too many times in the round (added too many stitches)
  • Made too many increase rounds before beginning non-increasing rounds
  • No measuring was done to know when to stop increasing rounds
  • No measurements were made during the project to ensure width and height was correct

Now that we’ve touched on some common crochet problems in the round, let’s start crocheting a beanie!

Today I will be sharing my perfectly textured Greenbrier Beanie crochet pattern. This design features a combination of single crochet stitches, half-double crochet stitches, front-post double crochet stitches, and double crochet stitches that come together to create a warm, textured fabric. The seamless ribbing is super easy to accomplish by placing single crochet stitches into the back loop only. Although this may be considered an intermediate pattern due to the stitches involved, I truly think anyone can complete this beanie. If you’re not sure how to do front post double crochet stitches, CLICK HERE for an easy to understand tutorial offered by Red Heart Yarns.

Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern

Skill Level:

Easy to Intermediate

Materials:
Size of Completed Project:

Size: Adult small/teen

Crown Width: Fits up to 7.25″

Hat Circumference: Fits up to 21.5″

Hat Height: 8.0″

Abbreviations and Stitches Used:

Beg – beginning
BLO – back loop only
Ch – chain
Dc – double crochet
FPdc – front post double crochet
Hdc – half double crochet
Inc – increase
Magic ring (magic loop)
Rep or * – repeat
Rnd(s) – round(s)
Sc – single crochet
Sl st – slip stitch
St(s) – stitch(es)
YO – yarn over

Special Notes:
  • Ch 1 and/or ch 2 at the beginning of a round does not count as a stitch unless otherwise noted.
  • Terminology in U.S. terms

Beanie Pattern:

Begin with a magic ring (magic loop).

  1. Ch 1. Place 12 hdc into magic ring. Sl st to the top of the 1st hdc st. (12) 
    *Pull the tail that was created by the magic ring to tighten the center hole.
  2. Ch 1. Work 2 hdc in same st. Place 2 hdc in each st around. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st hdc st. (24)
  3. Ch 2. Dc in same st. Place 2 dc in next st. *Dc in next st, 2 dc in next st*. Rep from *. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st dc st. (36)
  4.  Ch 2. Dc in same st. Place 2 dc in the next st. Fpdc in the next st. *Dc in next st, 2 dc in next st, FPdc in next st*. Rep from * all the way around. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st dc st. (48)
    Note: The edge of your hat may appear to be wavy after this round. I promise it will straighten out! Indentations are caused by the FPdc stitches, but the edge will look perfectly even once we reach the bottom of the hat.

    This image shows where you will be placing each stitch in Round 4 of the Greenbrier Beanie
    This image shows where you will be placing each stitch in Round 4 of the Greenbrier Beanie. Note that FPdc stitches will appear to be shorter than dc stitches, which makes the edge look uneven after this round. It will straighten out, I promise! 🙂
  5.  Ch 2. Dc in same st, and in the next st. Place 2 dc in the next st. FPdc in the next st. *Dc in next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st, FPdc in next st*. Rep from * all the way around. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st dc st. (60)
    Note: In this round, you will be placing the FPdc sts directly on top of the previous round’s FPdc sts so that they line up perfectly. If you notice that your FPdc sts aren’t lining up correctly, I would recommend checking your stitch count.
  6. Ch 2. Dc in same st, and in the next 2 sts. Place 2 dc in next st. FPdc in next st. *Dc in next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st, FPdc in next st*.  Rep from * all the way around. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st dc st. (72)
  7. Ch 2. Dc in same st, and in the next st. FPdc in next st. *Dc in next 2 sts, FPdc in next st*. Rep from * all the way around. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st dc st. (72) See image below.
    Note: In this round, you will be placing FPdc sts both in between and on top of the previous round’s FPdc sts. At the end of the round, you should have a total of 24 FPdc sts and 48 dc sts.

    This image shows where you will be placing each stitch in Round 7 of the Greenbrier Beanie
    This image shows where you will be placing each stitch in Round 7 of the Greenbrier Beanie. Each FPdc stitch in this round will be separated by 2 dc stitches.
  8. Rep Round 7 (72 ) See image below.

    Falling Spring Crochet Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern Round 7 Stitch Sequence Image
    Here is another image showing the stitch sequence in Round 7/8. The first dc stitch after a FPdc stitch is kind of hard to see, so I’ve marked where each dc needs to go to help you see things more clearly. The red arrow and tapestry needle are pointing at the post you will be working around when making a FPdc stitch. I hope this image helps!
  9. Ch 2. Skipping the first st, FPdc in the next st, then FPdc in the first skipped stitch. (One crossed Fpdc made.) *Skip next st, FPdc in next st, FPdc in skipped st*. Rep from * all the way around. Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st dc st. (72)

    Falling Spring Crochet Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern Round 9 Crossed FPdc Stitch Image
    The top image shows which stitch post to skip and which post to FPdc around first in Round 9. The red arrow on the right is the first stitch post you will be skipping (and is the second one you will FPdc around). The red arrow on the left is the stitch post you will FPdc around first. The middle image shows the first FPdc being made around the second stitch. The bottom image shows the second FPdc being made around the first stitch. This completes one crossed FPdc.
  10. Ch 1. Hdc in same st and in each st around. Sl st to the top of the 1st st.  (72)
  11. Rep Round 9. (72)
  12. Rep Round 10 (72)
  13. Rep Round 10 (72)
  14. Rep Round 9 (72)
  15. Rep Round 10 (72)
  16. Rep Round 10. *Note: Color Change Option – If you would like to join a new color for the brim, be sure to do so by yarning over with the new color on the last YO of the last stitch in Round 16.* Join with a sl st to the top of the 1st hdc st. (72)
    DO NOT FASTEN OFF. CONTINUE BELOW FOR RIBBED HAT BRIM.

Ribbed Brim:

Next, we will create the ribbing for the brim of the hat. Continue with working yarn from the end of Round 16. Change to size 4.0mm crochet hook.

*NOTE: You can adjust the width of ribbing easily by adding additional chains in the first row. This ribbing will measure approximately 1.25″ wide.

  1. With size 4.0mm crochet hook, ch 7. Sc BLO in 2nd ch from hook and in the next 5 sts. (6 total sts). Sl st into the next 2 available sts on the base of the hat. Turn. See images below.
    Falling Spring Crochet Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern How to Make a Ribbed Brim with Single Crochet Back Loop Only Stitches
    This image shows how to get your brim started. First, you will chain 7 (top image). Next, you will sc in the back loops only of the next 6 stitches (middle photo). The final image shows what the beginning of your brim will look like with all 6 sc BLO stitches complete.

     

    Falling Spring Crochet Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern Ribbed Brim Where to Slip Stitch on Base of Hat
    This image highlights the two stitches that you will slip stitch into on the base of the hat.
  2. Skipping over the 2 sl sts just made on the base of the hat, sc BLO in the next 5 sts created in the last row, then sc into both loops of the last st. Ch 1. Turn.
    Falling Spring Crochet Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern Ribbed Brim SCBLO Instructions
    This image shows where you will be placing each sc BLO when crocheting back across the ribbing. The tapestry needle in the top image highlights the first stitch that you will sc BLO into once you’ve skipped over the two slip stitches on the brim. The needle in the bottom image highlights the last stitch (6th stitch) of the ribbing. Remember to always single crochet under both loops of the last stitch of ribbing to help keep the edges of the hat clean.
  3. Sc into both loops of the first st, sc BLO in next 5 sts, sl st into the next 2 available sts on the base of the hat. Turn.
  4. Skipping over the 2 sl sts just made on the base of the hat, sc BLO in next 5 sts created in the last row, then sc into both loops of the last st. Ch 1. Turn.
  5. Rep Rows 3-4 until you reach the end of the last row of ribbing.
    Sc into both loops of the first st, sc BLO in next 4 sts, sl st in last st of ribbing, sl st into the base of the 1st st where the ribbing began. Turn so you are working from the inside of the hat.
  6. This is the final row and will close the gap between the two ends of the brim. Making sure the ends of the brim are lined up evenly, stitch both sides together by slip stitching under both loops of both sides in the next 6 sts. Fasten off & secure tails.

That’s it my friends!

I hope you guys have enjoyed the Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern! Drop a comment below and let me know your thoughts!

4 thoughts on “Greenbrier Beanie Crochet Pattern FREE

  1. I just finished your Greenbrier Beanie for my granddaughter, and it turned out just the way I wanted! I must say that your pattern instructions were to the letter. It was a joy to make. I’d like to thank you so very much. Your designs are awesome! Your instructions divine! And its a much appreciated free pattern! So, Allison, thanx again, and keep on doing what you’re doing…..PLEASE. 😁

    1. I am absolutely thrilled that you enjoyed making the Greenbrier Beanie, Debra! 😊 I just love how much texture this hat has, and I hope your granddaughter loves it, too. 🙂 I truly appreciate your feedback and I will definitely keep the patterns coming!

      Thank you so much for taking the time to comment, Debra! Your kind words mean so much to me! ❤️

  2. Love your beanie pattern. Have to know though, why is it called the Greenbrier beanie? I’m from WV where the Greenbrier Resort is located in Lewisburg. Just wondered if there was any connection. Thanks for a great pattern.

    1. Hi, Jane! I’m happy to hear you love the pattern! What a small world this is. I live in Greenbrier County, hence the inspiration for the name! 😊

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